Photo of Gordon Brew in duotone

Summer is a busy time for us as we complete campaigns that will roll out in the fall and winter seasons. Yet, each of us will find an opportunity to close down our computers and set aside work for planned summer vacations. What are your plans for the summer? Whether on a plane or on a dock, summer provides the time and space for reading. Here are some suggestions from my CBM colleagues for what books to pack in your bag this summer.

Holly Ho, Team Lead, Finance & Accounting

Sabbath as Resistance by Walter Bruggemann

The author and the title drew me to this book, and I thought it might help me with emerging from the pandemic in my stage of life and circumstances. I realize I’ve lost the concept of intentional rest. I would recommend this book for its refreshing perspective on what sabbath means.

Kylah Lohnes, Program Officer

Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall-Kimmerer

I am reading this book for the second time this summer! I was initially drawn to it because it brings together two themes that I care a lot about: creation and Indigenous rights. The first time I “read” this book, I actually listened to it as an audiobook on my commutes through Toronto. Robin’s voice is so soothing and powerful and the stories were exactly what I needed to move my mind beyond the concrete jungle of the city and out into the fields, forests and waterways of the wider world. I would definitely recommend this book because it can spark really good ideas and practices around connecting with creation and learning from Indigenous people. It’s an invitation to really notice and fall in love with creation, and to do so through the eyes of those first trusted by God to care for this beautifully diverse landscape. 

Gato Munyamasoko, Peace and Reconciliation Specialist

This summer I am allowing Dr. Paul Stevens to be my teacher as I am reading Doing God’s Business – Meaning and Motivation for the Marketplace. This is my third book on the topic of marketplace ministries and it is the subject that has been filling my head for a while now.

Jessica Banninga, Communications and Social Media Specialist

21 Things You May Not Know About The Indian Act by Bob Joseph

I was drawn to this book because I think that as a Canadian settler, it is really important for us to know our history, even the parts that make us cringe, shake our fists and weep. I believe that we should not turn a blind eye to these laws that in fact, still govern and oppress Indigenous Peoples residing on Turtle Island (North America). If we want to walk in a good way with our Indigenous brothers and sisters, we must acknowledge the past and fight for a just future where we celebrate each unique culture, rather than trying to bury it. This book is great because it is shaped in a way that makes the Indian Act easier to read, understand and digest. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to begin or continue the long journey of reconciliation.

Wherever you find yourself this summer, it is our hope that you find the time to renew and recharge.